Trash cart rate increase makes public works director think about the future of recycling: “Bloomington is a community that is known to be entrepreneurial…”

Starting in the April billing cycle, Bloomington residents will pay more every month for trash and recycling service. That’s the result of a unanimous vote on the three-member board of public works at its regular meeting on Tuesday.

In round numbers, customers will pay between $3.50 and $23 more a year, depending on the size of the trash cart they use.

The fee increase is due to costs that are charged to the city by Republic Services for processing recycled materials. Those costs have replaced payments the city previously received (“rebates”) for its recycling commodities, according to Bloomington’s director of public works, Adam Wason.

Also at Tuesday’s meeting, Wason spitballed a possible new way of paving local streets.

The two topics—recycling pickup charges and road resurfacing—are related. How? Continue reading “Trash cart rate increase makes public works director think about the future of recycling: “Bloomington is a community that is known to be entrepreneurial…””

Beacon Benchmark: #TrashTagChallenge just means busing somebody else’s table

The Beacon is traveling around Bloomington by public bus this summer, as a way of trying out Bloomington Transit’s new smartphone passes.

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A grabber-claw device similar to the one used by The Beacon to clean up the alley connecting 6th Street with Kirkwood just west of Washington Street.

I made one trip on Route 3 to complete an errand to Bloomington Hardware. There I purchased a gadget for grabbing things at a distance. The business end is a kind of claw that closes when you squeeze the lever in the handle.

The three-foot long device was planned for picking up trash in the downtown alley that runs north-south between 6th Street and Kirkwood Avenue. Continue reading “Beacon Benchmark: #TrashTagChallenge just means busing somebody else’s table”