Margins, flipped results for mail-in versus in-person make Monroe County election stories

Much of the media coverage of 2020 primary elections focused on the mechanics of voting methods, instead of the campaigns.

That’s because the COVID-19 pandemic led the state election commission to postpone the primaries four weeks, from May 5 to June 2, and to make no-excuse absentee voting available for any voter. That meant every voter could vote by mail, instead of showing up in person to vote on any of the six days before Election Day or the day itself.

In Monroe County, a lot more people voted by mail, ahead of Election Day, than they did in 2016. Of the 26,791 voters who cast a ballot for this year’s primary, 17,785 (66 percent) did it by mail.

The 66 percent who voted by mail this year was more than twice the percentage who voted before Primary Election Day in 2016. The 2016 figure also includes mail-in ballots and in-person ballots cast during the early voting period.

Did the increased percentage of mail-in votes this year affect the outcome of any races? Maybe. Continue reading “Margins, flipped results for mail-in versus in-person make Monroe County election stories”

Democratic Party noms for senate, judge: Yoder, Krothe

 


Based on unofficial results of the June 2 primary, the Democratic Party’s nomination for the District 40 state senate seat is Shelli Yoder. The former Monroe County councilor prevailed over John Zody, the Democratic Party’s state chair, and Trent Feuerbach, with 81 percent of the vote. No Republican candidate appeared on the primary ballot for the District 40 senate seat.

Another closely watched race in the Democratic Primary was for the county circuit court judge Division 8 seat. Kara Elaine Krothe, an attorney in the county’s public defender’s office prevailed over Jeff Kehr, a Monroe County deputy prosecutor, with 68.5 percent of the vote. Krothe will face incumbent Republican Judith Benckart in the November general election.

The three county council incumbents—Geoff McKim, Trent Deckard, and Cheryl Munson—prevailed in the race for the Democratic Party’s primary for at-large county council seats. McKim, who was third among the incumbents with 24 percent of the vote, outdistanced Dominic Thompson by 12.5 points and Karl Boehm by 18 points. The November general election contest will feature the three Democratic Party nominees and two Republicans, James Allen and Zachary Weisheit.

[.pdf of June 2, 2020 unofficial cumulative results]

[.pdf of June 2, 2020 unofficial results by precinct]

By one-vote margin: Peter Iversen chosen to fill Monroe County’s council vacancy left by Shelli Yoder

On Thursday night, a caucus of the Monroe County Democratic Party (MCDP) chose Peter Iversen over Richard Martin to fill the vacancy left when Shelli Yoder resigned her District 1 seat on the county council, effective Nov. 1. Yoder served through the end of October.

Iversen prevailed by a 7–6 margin among the 13 precinct chairs from District 1 who attended the caucus. District 1 covers the eastern third of the county. Voting was by secret ballot.

Right after his winning tally was announced, Iversen was sworn into office by Monroe County’s clerk, Nicole Browne. Continue reading “By one-vote margin: Peter Iversen chosen to fill Monroe County’s council vacancy left by Shelli Yoder”

Yoder chairs her final meeting of county council: “Find what makes you come alive and go do it.”

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Shelli Yoder, president of Monroe County’s council, chairs Tuesday’s work session. (Dave Askins/Beacon)

Tuesday night’s Monroe County council’s work session was highlighted by debate on the issuance of $3 million worth of general obligation bonds—the item passed on a 5–1 vote with dissent from councilor Marty Hawk.

At the end of session, councilors marked the occasion of council president Shelli Yoder’s last time to preside over a meeting. Yoder announced her resignation last Thursday, effective at the end of October—she’s moving out of District 1, which she represents.

The council left the matter of electing a new president of the council for another time. Continue reading “Yoder chairs her final meeting of county council: “Find what makes you come alive and go do it.””

Yoder to leave Monroe County’s council due to residency change, still considering what’s next

In a release posted on Facebook, Democrat Shelli Yoder announced on Thursday that she is resigning from Monroe County’s council and will serve through the end of October. Yoder’s resignation was caused by a pending change in her residency, according to the release.

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In this photo from July 2019, Shelli Yoder chairs a meeting of the Monroe County council as its president. (Dave Askins/Beacon)

Yoder currently represents the county council’s District 1, which covers the eastern third of Monroe County and the northeast corner of Bloomington.

The release quotes Yoder as saying “Although this move will take my family into a different Bloomington neighborhood just beyond the border of District 1, my commitment to our community and Monroe County’s continued success is as strong as ever. I look forward to finding new opportunities to serve and to continuing the work of meeting the challenges we face at the local, state, and national levels.”

At-large seats on the council can be held by residents who live anywhere in the county. Asked by The Beacon via text message, if she had contemplated running for one of the three at-large positions on the county council that is up for election in 2020, Yoder replied: “I’m still considering what’s next.”

The three at-large seats on the seven-member council are currently held by Geoff McKim, Cheryl Munson, and Trent Deckard.

Yoder also told The Beacon that she plans to attend the joint meeting of the county council and the Bloomington’s city council, scheduled for 6:30 p.m. on Oct. 29  in the Nat U. Hill room of the county courthouse. That means Yoder will spend part of her antepenultimate day of county council service in the same room where she’s chaired its meetings as president of the council for the last couple of years. Continue reading “Yoder to leave Monroe County’s council due to residency change, still considering what’s next”