Vaccination rate in Monroe County trending up, pop-up clinics set for next week

The 14-day rolling average of final doses administered per day in Monroe County through April 29, 2021 stands at 902 (dark green line).

The number of final-dose vaccinations administered in Monroe County has seen a significant upward trend over the past four days.

That’s the impact of second shots of Pfizer vaccine now getting delivered at Indiana University’s Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall clinic site, after its launch at the end of March.

The 14-day rolling average of final doses administered per day in Monroe County through April 29 stands at 902.

At that rate, based on the total of 44,920 people who have been fully vaccinated so far, and a Monroe County population of 148,431, it would take about 65 days to achieve a 70-percent vaccination rate.

That would mean the 70-percent threshold—which is sometimes cited as a minimum for herd immunity—would be achieved in Monroe County on July 4.

Additional one-time local clinics are hoped to keep the momentum for vaccination going.

At Friday’s regular press conference of local leaders on COVID-19 response, county health administrator Penny Caudill announced that two pop-up clinics would be held in the coming two weeks.

On May 6 from 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., a pop-up clinic will be held at the Boys and Girls Club.

On May 10, a pop-up clinic will be held at the Monroe County convention center, starting at noon. That clinic, which will target local Hispanic residents, will use the Moderna vaccine, and the follow-up second shot will be set for June 7, Caudill said. Continue reading “Vaccination rate in Monroe County trending up, pop-up clinics set for next week”

Upward nudge in Monroe County COVID-19 case numbers means local health regs likely to stay in place, after governor’s April 6 end date

The dark purple line is the 7-day rolling average of confirmed positive COVID-19 cases. The height of the red line is at 21.2 cases a day. That’s the daily average below which Monroe County needs to stay in order to remain in the “yellow” category for weekly cases per 100,000 residents, in the state’s dual-metric classification scheme.

Indiana governor Eric Holcomb announced Tuesday an end to statewide COVID-19 restrictions, starting April 6.

But Monroe County health administrator Penny Caudill said on Friday that Monroe County’s regulations will remain in place for the time being.

That’s based in part on a recent uptick in positive cases in the county, which includes Indiana University’s campus.

Caudill was speaking at the weekly Friday news conference held by local officials on COVID-19 response.

Under the county board of health’s current health order, Caudill and county health officer Thomas Sharp have the “the ability to adjust restrictions—in any particular area—as required, in order to protect the public health.”

The county board of health is next scheduled to meet on April 6 at 4 p.m. Caudill said the board routinely looks at the pandemic data to make changes and adapt as numbers improve. Continue reading “Upward nudge in Monroe County COVID-19 case numbers means local health regs likely to stay in place, after governor’s April 6 end date”

Unknowns might shroud worse racial disparity as Indiana releases more COVID-19 information

REVISED R Horizontal Bar Chart COVID RACE Disparity County in Indiana UKNOWNS ARE UNKNOWNS

More kinds of data and more tools for visualizing it were a part of the re-vamped COVID-19 data dashboard rolled out on Monday by the Indiana State Department of Health.

The new dashboard shows that of the 2,960 ICU beds in the state, about a quarter of them are being used for COVID-19 patients, and a little over 30 percent for other patients. That leaves about 1,300 ICU beds open for future COVID-19 patients.

The new dashboard also gives a visual answer to the question that arises when the cumulative death total is reported as going up by some number of “new” deaths: To which previous days have those new deaths been allocated, so that the deaths square up with the date when they occurred?

Also added to the dashboard for Monday was a breakdown of the racial makeup of confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths in the state. Available through the data feed that populates the dashboard are county-level numbers.

Statewide, the number of deaths among Black residents stands around 20 percent, with 8.6 percent of deaths by people of unknown race. The Black population in Indiana is about 9.3 percent, based on 2018 American Community Survey numbers.

Even if none of the Unknowns are Black, that would still mean  that Blacks account for at least twice as many deaths from COVID-19 as their percentage of the population alone would predict. Continue reading “Unknowns might shroud worse racial disparity as Indiana releases more COVID-19 information”